Review: The Stuff

By Charlotte Castle - 3rd April 2014

At the same time as this horrifying discovery is taking place, the ice cream companies are not ready to go down without a fight and like any typical business man ready to take down their opponents in a fair fight, they hire a former FBI Agent to find out the origins of The Stuff and sabotage its production.

 

The whole idea of The Stuff is the horrific revelation that this seemingly innocent desert does more than just put on the calories. Sadly being somewhat of an animal lover, it was heart breaking and absolutely petrifying to see the first horror scene involve the brutal possession of what seems to be an innocent dog until it’s only him and his owner left in the house and then a monster emerges, elongating its host’s jaw and vast quantities of The Stuff dripping from their mouths. This scene was most disturbing - especially when it involves a household pet that many people refer to as man’s best friend. Now, it has become its owner’s oppressor while suffering at the hands of the gruesome alien dessert.

 

As the origins of The Stuff is explored, it is discovered that The Stuff is an alien parasite that when consumed, turns it’s host into a zombie-like puppet whilst consuming the rest of its host. This is the kind of subject that often turns people’s stomachs inside out and this film achieves that effect beautifully.

 

In addition to the knowledge of this parasite, there are some scenes that become very “edge of your seat” to see a young boy – Jason - trapped in a container with The Stuff was another unsettling moment in the film. The creamy desert is edging closer and closer and all the while, it is a race against time to get a child away from the danger before it is too late.

 

Due to the subject matter of the film, The Stuff can easily be interpreted as a metaphor for the huge consumption of junk food in a privileged society and how it seems to have a strong hold over people’s lives. Others may see this film as a metaphor for drug addiction due to the idea that even though characters outwardly seem fit and healthy but inside they are being consumed by an addiction that wants to control their mind and body. The final scene in the film is by far, the most influential scene in the film and draws together everything that this film has tried to address with a simple question “Are you eating it or is it eating you?”

 

Overall, The Stuff proves to be a quirky 80s cult classic. It harbours many of the traditional traits that we expect from an 80s classic - bold neon colouring, cheesy catchphrases and quirky one-liners. If there are any hardcore horror fans out there looking for a scare, this is probably not the right one for you. While there is no denying the fact that there are one or two disturbing moments in the film, it is certainly not one that a viewer could really take seriously. This by no means indicates that the film is bad, but what this does conclude is that The Stuff is a much more light-hearted classic that can still be enjoyed.

 

The Stuff is a classic that no true horror fan should miss, it will certainly make a good evening’s entertainment. Just make sure that the ice cream is left in the fridge.

 

The Stuff is available to buy on UK Blu Ray and DVD now.

If you want to watch The Stuff, I highly recommend you put that ice cream tub down before pressing the play button.

 

The Stuff is a cult classic 1985 horror film - directed by Larry Cohen -  about the addiction to a new creamy dessert that has become a new big hit on supermarket shelves.

 

One night two men are working late to discover a thick white cream emerging from the ground. Now, like any rational thinking person who has just come across a new alien substance, one of the men tastes the white creamy goo. Within months The Stuff is becoming so popular due to its addictive quality, ice cream companies are facing closure. However, throughout the course of the film, suspicion arises when a boy, opens the fridge for a late night snack to discover there is more to this sugary goo than meets the eye.